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Scrum Alliance Announces New Board Member

Scrum Expert - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 15:45
The Scrum Alliance has announced Lisa Hershman as its newest member on the Board of Directors. Lisa is a seasoned business professional, author, and speaker who brings a wealth of real-world experience and an innovative style to her work. She is the founder and CEO of the DeNovo Group™, a global consulting, training, and research firm focused on leadership and innovation through process management and redesign. DeNovo is a global leader in process consulting services, whose clients range from the Fortune 500 to a rapidly growing constituency in the nonprofit and ...
Categories: Communities

Inflection Points in Software Development

NetObjectives - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 15:29
At Net Objectives, we’ve been doing Agile at the team level for over 16 years and Agile at small scale (25-150) to large scale (1000 on up) for over a decade.  It is surprising how relatively few things must be identified and managed to do this well.  It’s also interesting that many of the large scale items must be managed at small scale as well.  For example, how teams work together must be...

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Categories: Companies

Identifying an Agile Transformation Scorecard

Leading Agile - Tue, 03/10/2015 - 15:26

identifying an agile transformation sc

In a previous post, I asked the question of how can we tell if we are succeeding with an enterprise agile transformation.  In the post I’ll close with the notion of using a balanced scorecard for signaling progress towards the transformation’s core business drivers.

A couple of comments were shared after the last post was published that cautioned on the dangers of creating a scorecard that would not drive the “right” behaviors or that was too broad and couldn’t be connected with the transformation’s  overall success.  This was great feedback and I appreciate the engagement with the post.

In keeping with my desire to resolve this question, I’ll explore a bit more of the notion behind why many organizations are seeking a transformation.  I think answering this question will help to frame up a sample balanced scorecard in another post.  Thanks for continuing to share your thoughts and feedback along the way.

So the question asks…

Why transform? I think it is fair to say that the number of reasons why an organization would seek an enterprise agile transformation could be as varied as the people of the world. Both unique and diverse. That said, I most often hear about the following handful of reasons for an enterprise to transform: (1) new competitive forces in the marketplace, (2) an inability to pivot or focus, and/or (3) quality issues.  Frequently the statement goes something like this:

“Our competitors are startups and they will try anything to eat our lunch.  It takes us almost a year to release a new idea into the marketplace and by that time we are several months behind the next startup.”

In this case I would probably orient around both (1) time to market and (2) innovation as key business drivers; but, it would be important to remember that innovation and time to market are usually not enough.  We would need to keep our eye on the ball with regards to business, cash or (3) return on investment. So, using traditional balanced scorecard perspectives, I would orient Financial around ROI, Customer around Quality, Ops and Processes around Time to Market, and Innovation around continuous improvement.

What are your thoughts, would you identify different themes for the scorecard or change the placement of the themes into different perspectives? Looking forward to hearing the opinions and views to this approach.

Thanks for reading!

The post Identifying an Agile Transformation Scorecard appeared first on LeadingAgile.

Categories: Blogs

Scrum Day For Professionals, Dallas, USA, March 27 2015

Scrum Expert - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 20:50
Scrum Day For Professionals Dallas is a one-day event organized by Scrum.org. Participants can meet world-class experts for a day of face-to-face learning. The will gain insights into Agile practices and network with other Scrum professionals. In the agenda of Scrum Day For Professionals Dallas you can find topics like “The New New Product Owner”, “Scaling Professional Scrum”, “Facilitating the Scrum Events: Tips and Tricks”, “Team Performance: The Impact of Clean Code and Continuous Delivery”. The opening keynote will be presented by Ken Schwaber. The other part of the conference is ...
Categories: Communities

What’s New in Axosoft 15.0?

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 19:58

Happy today! Here’s the latest updates in Axosoft Version 15.0.

Check out our Version History page if you want to know what bugs were squashed in this release.

What’s New-

In this smaller release we focused on updating custom fields for projects, customers, and contacts. If you go to Tools/ Fields/ Field Templates, you’ll notice that we have added a section for Projects, Customers, and Contacts.

We've added a editable field templates for projects, customers, and contacts.We’ve added editable field templates for projects, customers, and contacts.

Click the respective edit button, and you will be taken to an updated UI with new key pieces of functionality. Adding custom fields to these three areas are now similar to adding custom fields to your items. You can hit “add a custom field” to create custom fields that accept numbers, dropdown menus, and other familiar options.

Drag and drop the custom fields to update what you see when editing.Drag and drop the custom fields to update what you see when editing.

Users now have the ability to organize by sections. Click the “Add Section” button to create a new section for your field template. Name it appropriately, then drag and drop the custom fields you need for this section.  Once you’re all done, press “Save” and close. Keep in mind, the section feature is currently only available for project, customer, or contact field templates.

)Here is where you add a section and can build it out.

Take a look at that section we created for our contact field template example:

In this example we added section called "Region."In this example we added a section called “Region.”

Lastly, for any Axosoft users who send outbound emails, we have introduced the “Send and Update Workflow Step” button in the bottom right. It does exactly what it sounds like, and it should help streamline your daily routine.

Ah, convenient right?Ah, convenient right?

Those are the major changes for this release! Check out the other What’s New Videos to get a taste of our latest features. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for more updates in the pipeline.

Categories: Companies

What’s New in Axosoft 15.0?

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 19:58

Here’s the latest and greatest in Axosoft Version 15.0.

Check out our Version History page if you want to know what bugs were squashed in this release.

What’s New-

In this smaller release we focused on updating custom fields for projects, customers, and contacts. If you go to Tools/ Fields/ Field Templates, you’ll notice that we have added a section for Projects, Customers, and Contacts.

We've added a editable field templates for projects, customers, and contacts.

We’ve added editable field templates for projects, customers, and contacts.

Click the respective edit button, and you will be taken to an updated UI with new key pieces of functionality. Adding custom fields to these three areas are now similar to adding custom fields to your items. You can hit “add a custom field” to create custom fields that accept numbers, dropdown menus, and other familiar options.

Drag and drop the custom fields to update what you see when editing.

Drag and drop the custom fields to update what you see when editing.

Users now have the ability to organize by sections. Click the “Add Section” button to create a new section for your field template. Name it appropriately, then drag and drop the custom fields you need for this section.  Once you’re all done, press “Save” and close. Keep in mind, the section feature is currently only available for project, customer, or contact field templates.

)

Here is where you add a section and can build it out.

Take a look at that section we created for our contact field template example:

In this example we added section called "Region."

In this example we added a section called “Region.”

Lastly, for any Axosoft users who send outbound emails, we have introduced the “Send and Update Workflow Step” button in the bottom right. It does exactly what it sounds like, and it should help streamline your daily routine.

Ah, convenient right?

Ah, convenient right?

Those are the major changes for this release! Check out the other What’s New Videos to get a taste of our latest features. Subscribe to our YouTube channel for more updates in the pipeline.

Categories: Companies

You Have To Be Able To Sell It…

Leading Agile - Mon, 03/09/2015 - 11:00

All the great ideas are just that… great ideas… unless you can put them into practice.

I tell my team all the time that unless we can sell an idea to an executive… and know exactly what we’d do the next day if we sold it… it’s probably not worth talking about. At least not right now.

That’s not to say that we don’t run experiments. That’s not to say we don’t try new things.

There is a lot of neat theory out there… but unless you can get someone to sign up… it’s tough to make a dent.

You have to be able to sell it…

The post You Have To Be Able To Sell It… appeared first on LeadingAgile.

Categories: Blogs

Our Agile Transformation Metaphors are Broken

Leading Agile - Sun, 03/08/2015 - 18:00

I’m getting increasingly uneasy with how I see folks thinking about agile and planning for agile transformations. Too much of how we are thinking about this has to do with the activities of an agile transformation rather than the units of value the agile transformation is trying to achieve for the greater organization.

What I’m seeing is analogous to what lots of us used to do back in the days of waterfall Gantt chart project planning. Load up a bunch of activities into a schedule and start tracking the stuff we are doing rather than the outcomes we are achieving. Activity doesn’t always equate to outcome and even less so for agile transformations.

The ‘Manage the Activities’ Metaphor

Think for a moment all the stuff you might do to help an organization become more agile. You might want to get everyone trained in agile to start. You might want to get all the teams some coaching. You might start counting how many agile teams you’ve formed… or how many of those teams have ScrumMasters or Product Owners… or are doing daily standup meetings. But here is the problem, are any of those things actually the value you are trying to produce? Are they why you are adopting agile?

What would that user story look like? As a transformation lead, I want to run a ScrumMaster workshop, so people know Scrum? The value is at least one hop away. Maybe.

The problem is that I can’t necessarily correlate the number of people trained, or the number of coaching days applied, or the number of teams formed, or the number of ScrumMasters and Product Owners on staff, or even the number of teams doing daily standup meetings to the business outcomes that we promised for going to agile. I’d suggest that there are tons of organizations doing agile things, but not getting the value they want from their transformation. This tracking approach doesn’t work.

The ‘Tracks of Work’ Metaphor

Another pattern I see quite a bit when talking about agile transformation, especially with large traditional companies, has to do with managing the tracks of work that need to be tackled as part of an agile transformation. We know we need to address the executives. We need to address the project managers. We need to address the PMO and the portfolio governance group and the investment decisioning team and the finance folks and the release management teams.

This is similar in kind to the problem we had with creating a transformation activities backlog… what does it really mean if we address the executives, or the project managers, or the PMO or portfolio governance or the finance folks or the release management folks? We can theoretically redefine how all these folks work, create new process documents, create new artifacts, and even get them committed to this new way of working, but does it correlate to value? I’m suggesting that it does not. It’s more about how they all work together.

The ‘Self-Organizing’ Metaphor

While the first two approaches are most common amongst the practitioners we meet, most of what I read on blogs and see at conferences is some sort of variant of the culture first/extreme self-organization point of view. This approach usually involves training everyone in agile and is focused on changing mindset and teaching practices. The idea is that, after mindset is changed and practices learned, the people in the company are prepared to self-organize into an agile enterprise.

This belief is predicated upon the notion that the people closest to the problem are the best ones to solve the problem, and that if we can just get everyone thinking in the right direction, doing the right behaviors, practicing the right practices, that an effective system of delivery will follow. This is probably considered the most agile of all the agile transformation metaphors, but is probably the least satisfying and plan-ful to the non-agile organization trying to get started down the road to greater agility.

That in and of itself doesn’t invalidate the approach, it’s just that I don’t agree necessarily that the people doing the work are the best at organizing the system of delivery for doing the work. I do think that people should be on teams and have autonomy to self-select their work within their team. That said, most folks aren’t inherently systems thinkers and when you factor Conway’s Law into the equation, I believe some intentionality around system design is required.

So What’s Wrong With These Metaphors

The problem with these metaphors is that in some form or fashion, they are all about the stuff you are doing. They are all about things that are tangible like training or coaching or process design. They all are based on activities but fail to measure the value that we are trying to create for the organization. They are analogous to using Scrum to iterate through a waterfall project. What does it matter if I have design, development, or test user stories? None of that necessarily produces working tested software.

It doesn’t matter if I form an agile transformation team. It doesn’t matter if I create a backlog of the activities and plan my activities every two weeks. It doesn’t matter if I write my activities in the form of a user story. It doesn’t matter if my transformation has a ScrumMaster or a Product Owner. It doesn’t matter if I do retrospectives or know my transformation velocity.

What I care about is working tested software delivered on regular intervals. Using Scrum to deliver a random screen, or a piece of business logic, or a database table doesn’t matter either. What I get credit for is providing value to the customer in the form of something they can use. None of the trappings of agile or Scrum really makes that much difference when leading an agile transformation.

Our transformation then has to track something that our organization can measurably use. I need an analogy for value in an agile transformation. Make sense? If you guys are with me so far… let’s start talking about the unit of value of an agile transformation. What is it that we really should measure if we know we can’t effectively measure activities as a proxy for outcomes.

The ‘Iterative and Incremental’ Metaphor

I think about an agile transformation the exact same way I think about building a software system.

You build software systems in increments while progressively iterating over time to mature the functionality. You might imagine a software product that has 5 major features. Our job is to get the product to our annual trade show by the end of the year. More than likely, we’d build a MVP or MMF of the highest priority feature first, followed by the MVP or MMF of the remaining features in priority order, so we’d be sure of having a working tested something by the deadline.

As we completed the MVP for all 5 features, we might choose to go back and iterate any or all of the features to round out their capability and create a more robust, more fully functional product, one that is closer to our fully realized end state vision. If at any point I have to kill the project, release early, or just simply run out of time… I will have the most functional product I could possibly have given the constraints I was working under.

At all times the product was potentially shippable. Come hell or high water, we’ll have something for the trade show.

Now let’s take this analogy and apply it to an agile transformation…

  • The incremental part of the analogy is to think in terms of teams and organizations. Like a feature, teams and organizations are the capability of the enterprise.
  • The iterative part of the analogy is to think in terms of getting the organization to a base level of agility fast, something like an organizational agile MMF, and improving agility over time and on regular intervals.

Using this thinking tool then, the backlog of an agile transformation isn’t the activities we plan to do like training and coaching, but is rather the progressive maturity of various slices of the organization as they move through their agile journey.

Organizations and teams are the features and user stories of our transformation. Activities simply become the tasks. At any point in the transformation we might be doing training, coaching, and workshops… or forming an agile steering committee… or doing a retrospective… but all those activities are being done to move a part of the organization to a greater level of agile maturity.

That is how you plan and orchestrate an agile transformation.

Plan in increments of organizations and teams and iterate maturity until you are agile enough to go to market.

The ‘System Refactoring’ Metaphor

Using another metaphor borrowed from actually building software… most organizations have a tremendous amount of (not only) technical debt, but organizational debt, and business process debt that we are going to have to deal with. Most large organizations are not architected very well and a full of dependencies, overlapping value streams, defects, bottlenecks, sub-optimizations and local optimizations that are going to inevitably get in the way of effectively adopting agile across the enterprise.

As you begin the process of defining increments… and a plan for how to iteratively guide maturity… you are going to have to deal with the debt your organization has accumulated over time. That means you’ll have to align business process, technology, and architecture and start organizing around discrete services, putting boundaries around components and products, and wrapping these objects in tests so you know that they are working at all times. You have to start breaking dependencies and increasing local autonomy across the enterprise.

I’d suggest that anything which gets in the way of organizing this way, anything that get’s in the way of breaking dependencies, or governing in a way that respects these boundaries, or allocating resources in a way that makes these boundaries hard to preserve is an impediment that has to be removed to truly become and agile organization. I think that thinking about impediments this way makes them real and actionable and helps us pay more than lip service to real improvement.

In Conclusion

When you think about adopting agile as a process of incremental and iterative improvement… organization by organization… team by team… and removing the barriers to organizational agility as you go… the entire metaphor of using agile to implement agile begins to take on real meaning.

It’s not about using the process of Scrum to coordinate work, it becomes about using good organizational design principles to form teams, keeping the organization always shipping product, focusing on the basics of agile first, and incrementally improving agility over time as you break dependencies and reduce technical, organizational, and process oriented debt.

This to me is what it means to use agile to implement agile. I think until we starting thinking about adopting agile in this way… we are going to see lots of agile in name only type agile transformations.

Further reading:

The LeadingAgile Compass

The LeadingAgile Roadmap

The post Our Agile Transformation Metaphors are Broken appeared first on LeadingAgile.

Categories: Blogs

Founders as Programmers?

Bobtuse Bobservations - Bob MacNeal - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 20:47
A founder asked While outsourcing my startup, should I learn programming or just focus on customers and scaling?Founders don't need to learn programming. Outsourcing is a good call, but never if the...

Bobtuse can be wildly informative
Categories: Blogs

Learn the essentials of Scrum from a CSM, in less than 1 hour!

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 16:59

This webinar is for anyone excited (or mildly interested) in learning Scrum. Our very own Certified Scrum Master Jonathan Silva, and Brett Goldman from our Customer Success team, will cover the Scrum framework, team roles, and an example of how you can implement Scrum with your team. Join us now as we embark on this journey!

When you’re ready to implement Scrum and you need a tool, give Axosoft a try for free!

Categories: Companies

Learn the essentials of Scrum from a CSM, in less than 1 hour!

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 16:59

This webinar is for anyone excited (or mildly interested) in learning Scrum. Our very own Certified Scrum Master Jonathan Silva, and Brett Goldman from our Customer Success team, will cover the Scrum framework, team roles, and an example of how you can implement Scrum with your team. Join us now as we embark on this journey!

When you’re ready to implement Scrum and you need a tool, give Axosoft a try for free!

Categories: Companies

Building Strong Teams … and Schools

Rally Agile Blog - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 15:00

Sometimes there’s no better way to instill a spirit of teamwork and shared optimism than to work together on a project outside your company walls. When we get a chance to do this, our best selves shine through. Last week, on a day when the sun did not shine in New Orleans, over 200 Rallyers descended on a local school and were lit up with the spirit of giving.

We were gathered in New Orleans for Rally’s annual Sales Kick Off. It’s the one time of year when everyone from our worldwide sales team, plus those who support them, come together to plan and align around the common goal of serving Rally’s customers.

This year, we decided to invest 640 hours of Rally employees’ time to transform a school in an impoverished neighborhood that’s still recovering from the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, nearly 10 years later. Rally’s commitment to giving back to the communities in which we live and work has been part of our culture since the company’s inception.

CEO Tim Miller, living the “we give back” motto printed on the back of our shirts. He joined over 200 other Rallyers to transform the outdoor areas of an impoverished school in New Orleans East.

We built and painted benches for the playground and picnic tables for the learning garden. We transformed a gray chain-link fence into a mural of vibrant color. We painted walkway posts and created inspirationalsigns, including one that encourages the students to “Rally On”.

Projects included painting walkway posts bright colors and creating inspirational signs that hang in the covered walkways that connect the dozen trailers that make up the school.

“It was wonderful to have an opportunity to give back to those who lost so much in Hurricane Katrina. I’m glad to be part of a company that appreciates and supports giving back and paying it forward to the community." Skip Angel, Transformation Consultant

In November, Arthur Velasquez—a Rally Sales leader—was visiting the school and noticed kids playing soccer with some weathered balls on the empty field. Arthur thought that instead of spending money on company-logo swag this year, we should use those dollars to buy soccer goals and equipment for the school. He saw his vision come true last week as he poured the concrete to put those goals firmly in place.

Arthur Velasquez, Vice President of Sales Excellence, championed the project to turn an empty field behind the school into a soccer field by installing Rally-donated goals.

Company meetings are an easy place to get caught up in ourselves and the immediacy of our day-to-day work. By working together on a project outside the company, Rallyers got a dose of perspective and brought our teams closer together inside the company, too.

"Rally for Kids was humbling, emotional, inspiring, rewarding and hugely appreciated!” Greig Rabinowitz, Major Account Manager, Australia

“Best volunteer day ever! No contest.” Lynea Long, Services Operations for North America

“Working on the project to enhance a school reminds us of who we are and what we value. Incredible experience,” Kristen Haikal, Director of North America Revenue Marketing

If this story inspires you to do something similar at your company, I highly recommend working with a local HandsOn chapter. Our partner, HandsOn New Orleans, expertly helped us to create a service project that had impact in the community and was rewarding for everyone involved.

We captured the day in photos. Check them out on Google+.

Geri Mitchell-Brown
Categories: Companies

AgileEE Agile Eastern Europe, Kiev, Ukraine, March 27-28 2015

Scrum Expert - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 11:20
AgileEE Agile Eastern Europe is a two-day Agile and Scrum conference that offers Eastern European Agile practitioners a place to learn and discuss about Agile project management practices. Speakers are local Agile experts and well-known industry professionals from USA, Canada and Western Europe. One track is dedicated to talks in Russian. In the agenda of AgileEE Agile Eastern Europe you can find topics like “LeSS Scaling & Larman’s Laws of Organizational Behavior”, “The New Agile”, “Using simulational modelling for accelerating large lean transformation”, “Nokia Siemens Networks case study — Agile in ...
Categories: Communities

Agile Open Camp Argentina, Bariloche, Argentina, April 17-19 2015

Scrum Expert - Thu, 03/05/2015 - 19:34
Agile Open Camp Argentina is a three-day event that wants to gather Agile and Scrum practitioners of Argentina and Latin America. All the talks will be in Spanish. Agile Open Camp Argentina follows the open space format for conferences. Open space is a simple methodology for self-organizing conference tracks. It relies on participation by people who have a passion for the topics to be discussed. There is no preplanned list of topics, only time slots and a space in the main meeting room where interested participants propose topics and pick time ...
Categories: Communities

Enterprise Scrum Coach/Scrum Master – Dutch Speaker

Scrum Expert - Thu, 03/05/2015 - 19:19
This is a job opening for a Enterprise Scrum Coach/Scrum Master (Dutch Speaker) for a six month contract in Amsterdam. Requirements: * Agile coach for DevOps teams scrum master role * Minimal training at college level, Agile, Scrum * Experience with enterprise IT projects/teams Technical knowledge/experience: * Minimum 5 years of Agile/Scrum coach experience in enterprise organizations * Minimum 5 years experience in ScrumMaster DevOps teams in enterprise organizations * Knowledge and experience in software development, continous delivery Required languages for this role: * Dutch * English To apply, visit http://www.softdevjobs.com/
Categories: Communities

No Time to Learn

George Dinwiddie’s blog - Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:46

The number one problem I see at clients is that there is no time to learn. Without time to reflect on how things are working, we don’t notice the things that we’re accustomed to not working very well. Without time to research what others are doing, we can’t make informed choices about things we might want to try. Without time to try experiments, we can’t find out if a different approach will work better for us, or not. Without time to try multiple experiments, we can’t evaluate what works for us over a broad range of situations rather than latching onto the first idea that appears to work at all.

To a large degree, Agile software development IS learning. We try things mindfully, watch the results we get, reflect on why we get those results, and adjust. We do that at multiple levels of granularity, from choosing what products to develop to writing code that works reliably.

It takes time, but it pays off over time. To keep doing the same things in the same way suggests that we know everything there is to know about it, and there are no improvements left to make. That we are already at top speed. That we can only do worse than we are right now. I find that highly unlikely.

There is always more to learn. There are ways to learn better ways to learn.

Categories: Blogs

State of Scrum Survey Launched by Scrum Alliance

Scrum Expert - Thu, 03/05/2015 - 18:07
The Scrum Alliance has announced the opening of its biennial 2015 State of Scrum Survey, which gives the Scrum community deeper insight into the progress and adoption of Agile and Scrum processes. “We published the first State of Scrum report in 2013, and it’s a very popular benchmark report. Those interested in Scrum simply want unbiased data about who is using Scrum, why, and how, and that’s what we deliver in this report,” explains Scrum Alliance Managing Director Carol McEwan. The purpose of the State of Scrum report is to track trends ...
Categories: Communities

When Will We Complete Our Agile Transformation?

Leading Agile - Wed, 03/04/2015 - 17:53

People tend to ask me the general question of how long it will take to complete an Agile transformation.  Unless I’m responding to my son, in which the answer would be “5 more minutes”, my answer would be “it depends”. It’s just the reality, based on so many variables. At LeadingAgile, we describe the journey of a transformation as successfully getting a pilot group (expedition) from basecamp to basecamp. We then follow with other groups, when the path is clear and well maintained.

Let’s say you’re planning a long hike on the Appalachian Trail or climbing Mount Everest (transformation analogy). To calculate the time to complete the journey, the first thing I would look at on the trail map is the distance (to my final destination goal), then the elevation changes to my basecamps or resupply points, then I would look at the weather conditions.

Trail Map

Look at the graphic at the bottom of our compass page to visualize what I’m saying.  If you know where you are and know where you want to be, with mountaineering you are fortunate to look at the map, see your latitude, longitude, and elevation, and know if you’ve made it to your destination.  With Agile transformations, the coordinates on a map are actually your adoption levels in four of the five competency areas defined in our assessments: Defining the product, planning and coordinating, delivering solutions, and continuous improvement.  We’ll talk about the fifth competency area, organizational enablement, in a little bit.

Basecamps

If you were climbing Mount Everest, there are two basecamps, one on each side of the mountain. They are basic encampments for providing supplies, shelter, and communications for persons engaged in the trek. Supplies are carried to the basecamp by sherpas or porters (in our case it will be one or more of our guides). The criteria to reach each basecamp is different, depending on the destination. Using our compass, we know where you are, know where you are going, and know what gear you are going to need.  Though I know you want to reach your final destination, focus on reaching the next basecamp safely is critical.  Your transformation will fail, if you can’t get your team safely to a basecamp.

Weather Conditions

I see going from basecamp to basecamp as a change of location and elevation or a change in behaviour and outcomes within your organization.  The expedition will have to get used to operating at different elevations. But weather conditions are much more unpredictable.  If the weather conditions were unfavorable, and I have a long trek ahead to the next basecamp or summit, it could make an expedition harder than it need be or downright impossible. How do I know the current weather conditions? In our assessment, I use Organizational Enablement.

Organizational Enablement

In order for teams to improve in the other competency areas (reach basecamps), they should also improve in areas of organizational enablement.  If an organization refuses to form teams, provide a supportive organizational context, or ignore a series of other elements, it would be like walking into a blizzard in summer.  It’s going to slow you down to a crawl or stop you dead in your tracks.

In order for change to occur in your organization, you must enable it to happen.  Want to know how long it will take to complete an Agile Transformation?  I think you need to listen to your guide but you also need to control the weather.

The post When Will We Complete Our Agile Transformation? appeared first on LeadingAgile.

Categories: Blogs

ScrumImpulz, Bratislava, Slovakia, April 29 2015

Scrum Expert - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 18:43
ScrumImpulz is a one-day conference focused on Scrum that takes place in Bratislava, Slovakia. Local and international experts share their practical experience about the adoption of Agile approaches in software development projects. In the agenda of the ScrumImpulz you could find topics like “Management 3.0 – model for agile leaders”, “The worst fails that can occur in our agile team and how to deal with them”, “Global challenges require responses. People and teamwork are the best one” and a case study on Agile in the software development department of an international ...
Categories: Communities

From Software Development to Problem Solving

Scrum Expert - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 18:35
Agile and Scrum short iterations should provide software development organization with quicker feedback cycles and help them shifting from building the product right to building the right product. In their book “The Lean Mindset”, Mary and Tom Poppendieck provides an original perspective on this issue. What’s next is to stop thinking about software development as a delivery process and to start thinking of it as a problem-solving process, a creative process. Time and again we run into software delivery organizations – IT departments operating as cost centers and software firms working ...
Categories: Communities

Scrum Knowledge Sharing

SpiraPlan is a agile project management system designed specifically for methodologies such as scrum, XP and Kanban.