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The Objective of Time-Boxing

NetObjectives - Sun, 04/23/2017 - 14:22
This blog continues my series on Going Beyond Practices to Achieve Objectives   Timeboxing is used as a project planning technique. The schedule is divided into a number of separate time periods (timeboxes), with each part having its own deliverables, deadline and budget. In Agile, these time boxes are known as “iterations” (XP and generic Agile) or “sprints” (Scrum). The deliverables of each...

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Categories: Companies

Values, Practices and Principles Are Not Enough

NetObjectives - Sun, 04/23/2017 - 14:12
Agile has been around for over 2 decades now. Most every method talks about values, principles and practices. The Agile Manifesto, for example, is comprised of 4 values and 12 principles. XP, Scrum, Kanban, SAFe, LeSS and Nexus have added a considerable number of principles and practices as well. However, there has been little discussion of the laws of software development and insufficient...

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Categories: Companies

Design Your Competition's Support Department

You are presented with a common business problem.  One technique that has always helped me to define the problem space is to invert the problem, take it to an extreme to explore the continuum of your domain.  Let's imagine that we want to redesign our software support department at MegaSoft Corporation.  Applying our inversion principle we will leave our MegaSoft support as is, and instead we will design the competitors support group. It's going to stink, people are going to hate to even call them, their people will be arrogant techies with no human compassion - they will actually hire with those skills required.  Let's pause and give this company a name...  TechHard sounds great.

Who's time is most valuable?  At TechHard the support engineers time is very valuable, so we will have process that time how long a support tech. is on the call with a customer so that our process gurus can optimize for the use of this most valuable resource.  A typical call from a director or VP in our internal support operation should be logged by an administrative receptionist (maybe even automated system) and then the support techs time can be queued up with return call tickets.  We will return the VPs call when it is convenient for our tech.  The tech can validate that the VP is authorized to access the system, and will confirm that they are still experiencing the problem by walking through a standard checklist.  Being efficiently minded the tech may skip over some simple question like power plug, on/off, reset/reboot, logout/in again if they feel the user is competent.


Answering the basic question of who's time is most valuable via the design of the competition's process is enlightening.  Which is it?  The support person's time - or the customer's time.

How are support systems designed?  Has anyone ever heard of a company that used Design Thinking or High-Tech Anthropology to create a customer centered support group?

Is this Conway's Law at work - are we truly designing the support function of our products/services - or are we just reacting?

Give me an example of great design for support:  Nest Thermostat and Fire Alarm Installation
Have you installed a Nest product?  Their installation and configuration process is well designed.  I don't know about their support department - but my expectations are set very high, if I have a problem.


History will repeat
In the 1980s universities started teaching about design for manufacturing (robots would make the parts).

Are you designing your business departments for it's function?

Speaking of support tools - your going to want a great issue tracking system.  Why not look to a market leader that has all the features your people can put on a check list?  Let's buy Jira - or should we look at the competition's product?



See Also:

Cable Internet provider Frontier's support group struggles with the corporate infrastructure that can not resolve customer problems.







Categories: Blogs

The Question Isn’t” Scrum Vs Kanban?” or Even “Scrum and Kanban?” But Rather “What Works?”

NetObjectives - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 19:11
If you find this topic interesting, check out our webinar Blending Kanban and Scrum Or What to do When Neither Kanban or Scrum Is Optimal Executive Summary We should not be debating whether Scrum or Kanban is better.  Both have practices and principles to offer.  Each has a different mindset towards learning, however.  But instead of just blending them, we should look to a mindset that embraces...

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Categories: Companies

Dialogue on Prerequisites for Collaboration

IDEO-University 'From Ideas to Action' Lesson 1.

Join the dialogue on G+ Agile+ group.

Dialogue on Collaboration on Facebook (PDF)


Collaboration starts with who we are and our story - not the technology or the data
"The Future of Work Is Social Collaboration from Inside Out, where people connect around the why of work from who they really are as individuals in community.
They collaborate in generative conversations and co-create what’s next, i.e. their unique Contribution of value to society – what we might call Social Good.
They collaborate by taking the time to appreciate and align each other’s unique, hard wired, natural strengths, creating new levels of authentic and trusting relationships to take the Social Journey."Jeremy Scrivens Director at The Emotional Economy at Work

What does dialogue mean... what does it contribute to collaboration? Here's what the inventor of the internet Al Gore had to say about this:

Audie Cornish speaks with former Vice President Al Gore about the new edition of his book, The Assault On Reason.


Well, others have noted a free press is the immune system 
of representative democracy. And as I wrote 10 years ago, American democracy is in grave danger from the changes in the environment in which ideas either live and spread or wither and die. I think that the trends that I wrote about 10 years ago have continued and worsened, and the hoped-for remedies that can come from online discourse have been slow to mature. I remain optimistic that ultimately free speech and a free press where individuals have access to the dialogue will have a self-correcting quality. -- Al Gore
Excerpt from NPR interview with Al Gore by Audie Cornish March 14, 2017. Heard on All Things Considered.

See Also:

Mob Programming by Woody Zuill

If Your Team Agrees on Everything, Working Together Is Pointless by Liane Davey - HBR

[View the story "Dialogue on Prerequisites for Collaboration" on Storify]
Categories: Blogs

Book Review:: Agile Noir by Lancer Kind


 Agile Noir by Lancer Kind    and I'm envisioning a 1956 black and white film Kartar is the metaphor of his project.



First, allow me to layout some ground rules and a touch of the backstory...

I'm not a professional book reviewer, nor paid in anyway to read.  But if I could get that gig... I'd be a happy camper.  I've never written a book, but I've hacked out some code, a few articles, some of which might be considered book reviews.  I've worked in the Agile industry for more than a decade (but who's counting), and so - I may be a little close to the topic to have proper literary impartial bias.  In fact let me just go ahead and be explicit - I've done this, been there, got the t-shirt; I shit you not - this shit is for real!

Agile Noir by Lancer Kind
Now the ground rules...  I think this review will be written ... what's the word... while I'm reading, at the same time, without much delay in the reading - writing phases....in situ.... iteratively... oh I give up...

So don't be surprised - dear reader - if I just drop off in the middle...
                       ... maybe check back every week until I finish
March 22,
I've studied the cover... quite a nice graphic - to bad the whole novel isn't a graphic novel; oh - maybe it would be too bloody,  I could see Agile Noir becoming a Tarantino film.  As I sat looking at my book to-do stack... I skipped a few levels down the stack and pulled out Lancer Kind's 2016 Agile Noir.  I have read some of his previous comics titled Scrum Noir (vol 1, 2, 3).  So maybe I know what to expect - should be a fun romp in the fast lane with lots of inside the industry puns, innuendo and metaphors.

Well the damn dedication just reeks of an Agile Coach - Servant Leader (puke, barf.... moving on).

The High Cost of Schedule Slip
Now you may not find the situation Kartar finds himself in funny...  allow me to add some overtones of irony....  I'm going to go out on a racist limb and suggest that Kartar is an Indian.  That he is working in the heart of the Indian nation (Los Wages, NV), perhaps on a job for an Italian crime boss.  And none of these circumstances have anything to do with one of the world of science's biggest failures - Columbus's discover of the New World - which the thought was India, and named it's inhabitants there by creating the confusion we will have to deal with evermore.  Now Columbus was of course searching for a way to reduce the schedule required for shipping spices.

Kartar appears to be very emerged in planning and the art/science/pesdo-truth of planning and predicting the future of projects.  And he may be a master with the Gantt chart (which is footnoted on page 18).

This is all ringing just too true ... and I'm envisioning it in the style of a 1956 black and white film...

Kartar is the metaphor of his project... it seems that it's not quite on schedule... he's late to a just announced meeting with some superior and is driving at break neck speed on loose sand in the Vegas out skirts creating over bumps and ditches in his car with the accelerator pinned to the floor - because some people in a van might be trying to kill him.  Happens ALL - THE - TIME.

April 4th
Finished chapter 1.  That Bastard.  He killed off our hero Kartar.  oh - OPPS - SPOILERS!
I truly don't know if I should throw the book in the garbage bin or keep reading... going to bed.

April 6th
OK - that was quite the trick, Chapter 2, Rowing over a better Waterfall is a twist... but now it's getting interesting and our hero is back, yet I fear not quite in control of his project.

April 10th
The chapter Death by Documentation is just that... a death march, I almost quit.  The chapter is worth skipping if you have ever been on one of these classic projects - then you already know enough to thumb to page 89 and restart.  However if your not in IT or project management work of any type (Record Scratch: then how in the heck did you find my blog - and why are you reading this book?) you might enjoy the chapter as it will explain how all of your companies IT project fall behind schedule and never deliver what you want.  Read it - little bells of enlightenment will chime in your head.

The introduction of the IT Mechanic is quite fun.  He's almost a stalker... yeah, he's definitely a PM stalker.  This character is going to be fun.  He's reminding me of someone I've met... and someone from my youthful days of reading Carlos Castaneda.  The character's name is "J" could it stand for Jaun (as in don Jaun Matus)?  He's got an interesting calling card with no numbers or email addresses.  I'd recommend he try Moo - best printing house in the business.  J has some psyc skills and quite a few trick up his sleeves (he is living in the land of Penn & Teller after all).

I really enjoyed this chapter, but then almost any thing would be great after that death slog of documentation hell.

April 12th 
Sprinting is the right word for the next chapter... it's a dash by Usain Bolt.  In Sprinting with a Bollywood Autobot Kartar learns to write user stories and mix drinks of analysis, design, requirement, and development.  He attempts to negotiate on delivery with the owner and in the end crosses the third rail of the PMI tracks in a Lovers quarrel.  Oh - damn, that's not at all what happens.  But it's a lot of fun and went by really fast.  Don't know if we can sustain this pace for the rest of the book.

April 19th
Scrumming in a Waterfall - nice visual, great chapter.  I'm pulling for Kartar, he's doing all the right behaviors, making mistakes and learning each step of the way.  One day he's going to land this project in the success column of management's spreadsheet.  It appears that's how interested the big boss is in the project (affectionally called "Winner").  It's right when Kartar is about got the dirty little secret of Scrum figured out in this iteration that the Lovers, Sis & Lex show up and we cycle under the pressure of the waterfall, tumbling and gasping for air.  

How do you explain water to a fish?  I'm thinking that Kartar is learning all kinds of things in this iteration.  He's gotten lesson at the firing range, upgrade his tiny pistol to an arsenal that Fiona Glenanne (Burn Notice) would be proud of - maybe she'd invite Kartar to show her his car trunk.

But by the end of this chapter - we are back in the rabbit hole with Alice and late, we're late, for an important date.

Table of Contents:
  1. The High Cost of Schedule Slip
  2. Rowing over a better Waterfall
  3. Death by Documentation
  4. The IT Mechanic
  5. Sprinting with a Bollywood Autobot
  6. Scrumming in a Waterfall
  7. Product Vision
  8. Sustainable Pace
  9. Liberation and Libations
  10. Agile Development is about having FUN!
  11. Why Let Your Framework Limit You?



See Also:
Scrum Noir - several volumes of graphic novel about scrum masters and the projects they encounter - also by Lancer Kind
I will have a Double Expresso - Amazon review of Scrum Noir.
Categories: Blogs

Waggle Dance -or- Standup Meeting

Bees do a dance that bee keeper refer to as the Waggle dance...

It is with great pleasure that you can watch and using the power of science have this dance translated into English.

Bee Dance (Waggle Dance) by Bienentanz GmbH
What does this have to do with Scrum?  The power of a metaphor was well known to the creators of Extreme Programming (XP) - so much so, that it is one of only 12 "rules" that those really smart people decided to enshrine into their process.  It is also the most likely rule to not be mentioned in any survey of software development practices.  Unless you happen to be chatting with Eric Evens, and he may agree that he's captured the underlying principle in Domain-Driven Design, the Ubiquitous Language pattern.


Have you ever observed a great scrum team using a classic tool of many innovative company environments - the physical visual management board (Scrum Task Board). The generic behavior for a small group of people (say around 7 plus/minus 2) is for the group to discover that a form of dance where the speaker moves to the board and manipulates objects on the board as they speak gives everyone else the context of what story they are working upon and what task they are telling us they have completed. Then they exit stage left - so to speak. And the next dancer approaches from stage right, to repeat the dance segment. Generally speaking one circuit of this group is a complete dance for the day. The team is then in sync with all there team mates, and may have negotiated last minute changes to their daily plan, as the dance proceeded. In my observation of this dance great teams complete this ritual in about 15 minutes. They appear to need to perform this dance early in the morning to have productive days. And groups that practice this dance ritual well, out perform groups that are much larger and groups that don't dance.


So going all honey bee meta for a moment...  Let's use our meta-cognition ability to think about the patterns.  We love to pattern recognize - our brain is well designed for that (one of the primary reasons a physical visualization of work is so much more productive as a accelerator of happiness than virtualization of the same work items).

When do we use great metaphors - in design great NEW experiences for people that are reluctant to change.  And to communicate the desired behaviors, the exciting new benefits to adopting something new.  I'm thinking of the 1984 introduction of the Graphical User Interface by the Apple pirate team that produced the GUI, the Mouse, the Pointer, the DropDown Menu, etc.

Can you see a pattern in this... a pattern that relates to people changing systems, behaviors, disrupting the status quo?  It is resonating in my neurons, I'm having a heck of a time translating these neuron firing waves of intuitions, into the motor cortex to make my stupid fingers pound out the purposefully retarding movements on a QWERTY keyboard to communicate with you over Space-Time.  If only we could dance!

See Also:

The Waggle Dance of the Honeybee by Georgia Tech College of Computing
How can honeybees communicate the locations of new food sources? Austrian biologist, Karl Von Frisch, devised an experiment to find out! By pairing the direction of the sun with the flow of gravity, honeybees are able to explain the distant locations of food by dancing. "The Waggle Dance of the Honeybee" details the design of Von Frisch's famous experiment and explains the precise grammar of the honeybees dance language with high quality visualizations.
This video is a design documentary, developed by scientists at Georgia Tech's College of Computing in order to better understand and share with others, the complex behaviors that can arise in social insects. Their goal at the Multi-Agent Robotics and Systems (MARS) Laboratory is to harness new computer vision techniques to accelerate biologists' research in animal behavior. This behavioral research is then used, in turn, to design better systems of autonomous robots.


I was just reminded of @davidakoontz's wonderful metaphor for the daily #Scrum: waggle dance :) pic.twitter.com/h3c1B49mkC

— Tobias Mayer (@tobiasmayer) April 7, 2017


Categories: Blogs

Agile Portugal, Lisbon, Portugal, 2-3 June 2017

Scrum Expert - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 10:30
Agile Portugal is a two-day international conference that gathers practitioners from the Agile software development and Scrum project management community with invited international leading experts...

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Categories: Communities

Agile Coach Camp Denmark, Dragor, Denmark, May 18-20 2017

Scrum Expert - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 09:00
Agile Coach Camp Denmark is a three-day event that serves as an unconference for Agile coaches of Denmark and other countries. The Agile Coach Camp Denmark is a free, not-for-profit, practitioner-run...

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Categories: Communities

GitKraken v2.4

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 22:14

In GitKraken version 2.4, substantial improvements have been made to lots of actions you perform every day. You know those little quirks in GitKraken that sometimes made you say an expletive out loud? It turns out that one of our own, Dan Suceava, regularly swears at his monitor, oftentimes with GitKraken being the recipient of his wrath.

Who is this Dan Suceava?

Hmm, where should we begin…. You don’t know Dan, but you probably use his deftly-coded API regularly. Dan is the VP of Engineering here at Axosoft and has been with the company for more than 11 years. Even though he’s not an active GitKraken developer, his work touches all aspects of Axosoft as a company. You could say that a piece of Dan goes into every release—but that’s a somewhat disturbing thought!

Anyways, what does he actually do, you might also ask? This question is harder to answer. All we know is, he turns up to work, and then, later, he leaves. Between his comings and goings, Dan enjoys saying “no,” a lot, he swears at his computer, and he drinks more Jack Daniel’s than any mortal man should. A sort of engineering equivalent to a Boo Radley–Sasquatch hybrid; he sits in a dark corner of one of our dev rooms, only to be rarely spotted in the kitchen. Some say he eats squirrels. Some say he uses Windows ME. But one thing no-one disputes is that Dan is a coding powerhouse. Much of Axosoft’s success can be attributed directly to Dan!

A rare sighting of Suceava outside of his natural habitat

So when it became apparent that one of Dan’s favorite products, GitKraken, is also the recipient of some of his curse words, the GitKraken team wanted to make things right. As a tribute to Dan, the GitKraken team is dedicating a release (or two) to fixing the issues that made Dan go through his stockpile of Jack Daniel’s at twice the rate he normally would. After getting a demo of his issues with GitKraken, the team realized these issues are going to make a lot of people (except for Jack Daniel) very happy.

Suceava updates
  • Before: GitKraken would dismiss 99.7% of issues as “user error,” muttering profanities under its breath.
  • Now: GitKraken is polite as can be, updating submodules correctly when switching branches, and initializing them faster (and recursively, if a submodule has submodules).
  • Before: When refreshing, there was a 90% chance that GitKraken DSRC either shrugged or barked “NO!” The other 10% of the time, the app took 3 days to complete the action.
  • Now: Commit sorting algorithm improvements mean the app is faster when refreshing.
  • Before: The app got drunk and forgot where it was, randomly disappearing only to reappear several hours later.
  • Now: the app remembers whether or not it was in full-screen mode when shut down, and the location of its Window. It will restore these settings when restarted.
  • Before: Checking out a remote branch beyond the graph history made the app highly irritable, giving the message “I should have started a farm,” and then accusing you of user error.
  • Now: Checking out a branch beyond 2,000 commits creates a local ref and checks out the branch, error-free.

This release includes 15 more bug fixes and other improvements. See the release notes for all the details.

P.S. Release notes can be translated from English to Suceava—enjoy!

Categories: Companies

Agile Alliance Announces AGILE2017 Program

Scrum Expert - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 18:12
The Agile Alliance has announces the program for AGILE2017, the largest international gathering of Agilists. The conference is widely considered the premier global event for the advancement of Agile...

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Categories: Communities

Scrum Alliance Creates Partnership With LeSS Company

Scrum Expert - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 17:34
The Scrum Alliance has announced a partnership with LeSS Company to support widespread adoption of Large-Scale Scrum (LeSS). Scrum Alliance interim CEO Lisa Hershman said, “Recognizing that...

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Categories: Communities

Storytelling: the Big Picture for Agile Efforts

Scrum Expert - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 16:32
Agile reminds us that the focus of any set of requirements needs to be on an outcome rather than a collection of whats and whos. Storytelling is a powerful tool to elevate even the most diehard...

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Categories: Communities

Can we have a dialogue about Estimation and the behaviors it drives?


Some topic are taboo - not safe to discuss.  I've never appreciated that concept.  Those taboo topics are my favorite topics to discuss.

Taboo Topics (ordered by fear of conversation)
  • Gender - Sexual preferences - non-standard practices
  • Religion as truth, my religion vs your wrong religion
  • Politics - the correct way to govern a group the results in my opportunity
  • Pay for services rendered - why my gender is paid more than yours
  • counting - off by one errors and how to mask them; we're # 1
  • estimates - how wrong your estimate was and why I'm missing my commitment
  • prioritization - ordering methods
  • laziness - the art of not doing work
I've recently been embroiled in a "dialogue" about the twitter topic of #NoEstimates.  I would write a summary of the topic but cannot do better that this one:

Estimates? We Don’t Need No Stinking Estimates! by Scott Rosenberg
"How a hashtag (#NoEstimates) lit the nerdy world of project management aflame — or at least got it mildly worked up."

A nice summary of the dust-up.  Imagine if the tag would have been #LeanEstimates?

There are two sides to this debate - at least two sides.  But I like that the taboo topic was raised and has questioned assumptions.  I think the think that drives a topic toward the taboo is this questioning of assumptions.  The saluter of scared cows (where does that term even come from?).

So what behaviors does the process or estimating drive:


  • a list
  • TBD
  • someone misplaced the list...


"Unable to estimate accurately, the manager can know with certainty neither what resources to commit to an effort nor, in retrospect, how well these resources were used.  The lack of a firm foundation for these two judgements can reduce programming management to a random process in that positive control is next to impossible. This situation often results in the budget overruns and schedule slippages that are all too common." -- J.A FarquharDoes a Scrum process framework and the Agile mindset resolve Farquhar's concerns that the manager may have without accurate estimates - via empirical measurement and relative estimation techniques?

I'm not sure that the Twitter-verse is capable of holding the dialogue.  My experience was not very fruitful nor enlightening.  I've been accused by a manager at work of being "anti-management" I've asked, but got no direct answer, what that term meant, and why he believed or thought this label to be useful.  I've wondered if it was because of this type of conversation.  I also asked these fellows, but didn't resolve my query with the rhetoric of the conversation.
@vishalsomal it's an anti-management movement started by Woody, where SWDev wants to run the show @PeterKretzman @henebb pic.twitter.com/lPxrYNDg9n— Glen B. Alleman (@galleman) March 5, 2017... deleted ... a lot of tweets about actions from years ago when when the #NoEstimates twitter conversation was beginning - some relating to a blog post being edited or complete deleted.  Something I find quite acceptable (and do quite frequently myself).
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco So if he deleted a piece you appear to object to maybe you made a point and he heard your view.— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco is it admirable to be the accuser but not reach out to talk,
to label one hyper-defensive when they are trying to understand? pondering— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@PeterKretzman @davidakoontz @henebb @duarte_vasco David, U do realize W and V and now N blocked any questions about the credibility of #NE.
There is NO conversation about NE just broadcast— Glen B. Alleman (@galleman) April 14, 2017
@galleman @PeterKretzman @henebb @duarte_vasco 3 people do not make the sum total of people discussing this topic.— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 14, 2017
@davidakoontz @galleman @PeterKretzman @duarte_vasco Of course not. No one is claiming that either. But they are the main champs. Traveling the world, spreading the message.— Henrik Ebbeskog (@henebb) April 14, 2017
@galleman @PeterKretzman @henebb @duarte_vasco So I reject your conclusion; and substitute #NE or #noestimates with #LeanEstimates— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 14, 2017
The conversation went on from there...  I'm reminded of Adam on MythBusters.



@henebb @galleman @duarte_vasco I don't know if this anti-management you speak of. Tell me more as I don't see connection to NE or as we call it now #LeanEstimation— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017 ... and there is some link to Anti-Management because one is willing to discuss better options or worse options than estimation...
@henebb Here's an anti-management tweet (one of many) from the NE founder. @davidakoontz @galleman @duarte_vasco pic.twitter.com/CdVrQxYOAz— Peter Kretzman (@PeterKretzman) April 13, 2017
@PeterKretzman @henebb @galleman @duarte_vasco Is it the answers or the questions you object to as being anti-management?— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@PeterKretzman @henebb @galleman @duarte_vasco ... 2/2 because I'm willing to engage in dialogue about #NoEstimates in public? Is anti-management contagious? #LeanEstimates— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017 There appears to be large amounts of animosity amongst the principle people that were having this dialogue - nope that word is not the best word, here... try debate... twitter shouting match...
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco well that certainly didn't happen, thanks to your vigilance; have you asked him if that was his intent?— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@davidakoontz @henebb @galleman @duarte_vasco Point: Woody won't talk with critics.
Second point: you're a little too fixated on this one example of anti-mgmt. As I said, there are many.— Peter Kretzman (@PeterKretzman) April 13, 2017
@PeterKretzman @henebb @galleman @duarte_vasco So you didn't ask Woody about the issue?
Is it just you he will not talk to, because I've chatted with him a lot.— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco I like that analogy... estimate are addictive - but not that powery - what is your object to the analogy?— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco brushing teeth is not addictive; it's nothing like heroin addiction I'm told.— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@davidakoontz @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco ...Yeah, and seeing healthy estimating as "addiction process" reveals that you despise estimates.— Henrik Ebbeskog (@henebb) April 13, 2017
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco wow - how did you jump to that conclusion?
"despise estimates" not many of the team members I work with would support your conclusion— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco ah... do we need to review the concept of analogy - I liked the analogy, I find it useful; I think that's different than what your stating— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@henebb @PeterKretzman @galleman @duarte_vasco that's not where I would apply the nature of addiction in the analogy. Yet I can see how you could get there.— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 14, 2017 How might the analogy of estimation is like addiction be a useful analogy?
@galleman @PeterKretzman @henebb @duarte_vasco That's not consistent with my conversation and experiences with @WoodyZuill (your good with logic - am I within the set of anyone?)— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017
@PeterKretzman @henebb @galleman @duarte_vasco I'm just guessing but I bet there was a period when he was willing to converse with you all.
pondering ... my experience extrapolated ...— David A. Koontz (@davidakoontz) April 13, 2017


See Also:


Impact of Schedule Estimation on Software Project Behavior
by Tarek K. Abdel-Hamid, SRI International Stuart E. Madnick, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
A Preliminary Inquiry into the Software Estimation Process by J.A. Farquhar, 1970
Categories: Blogs

Axosoft v17.1: Burndown Chart Update

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 22:59

In Axosoft v17.1, we made a small adjustment to the way burndowns work, which should provide more accurate velocities for our users. Prior to v17.1, velocity was strictly based on the number of hours that were entered using work logs. This was great for the apple polishers that entered all of their work logs at the end of the day, for all items, without exception—but it lead to a lot of confusion for teams that weren’t adding work logs for all of their items (or any of their items).

We heard your protests about not having to add work logs for every single item, and we’ve accepted your peace offering of a Pepsi can to free you from the oppression of work logs.

pepsi commercial

Too soon? Sorry.

Burndown Velocity Update

Prior to this release, teams that used story points for estimation had burndowns that were often nonsensical—or that disappeared because work logs didn’t often make sense when completed work was estimated in points. The one behavior that changed in this release is decreasing an item’s remaining estimate manually, or by setting the item to `completed`. Axosoft will now update the burndown velocity as you’re getting work done.

For example, let’s say you have a bug fix that is estimated to be 4 hours worth of work, and you move the item to ‘completed’ without adding a work log. Previously, Axosoft would update all of the data points in the burndown and subtract 4 hours worth of work, as if the item was never in the release.

Prior to v17.1: burndown prior to v17.1 4 hours of work removed from all days. (First day goes from 164 down to 160 hours.)

Now, moving an item with 4 hours of work remaining to ‘completed’, will only subtract the 4 hours from the current day, and the work you completed will be reflected in the velocity.

After v17.1: burndown after v17.1 4 hours removed only from today. (First day remains at original value.) What you can expect with this change

Because Axosoft was previously only using logged work for velocity, you may notice that your velocity is now greater than it was for any previous sprint. This should be a more accurate representation of the rate at which your team is getting work done because Axosoft is now taking into account all the work you’ve completed for your items.

For more details about Axosoft burndown charts and velocity calculations, check out our support documentation.

Categories: Companies

Introduction to DevOps with Chocolate, LEGO and Scrum Game

Scrum Expert - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 16:15
If one of the first aim of Scrum was to break the silos between business analysis, development and testing, you can consider that improving the cooperation with the operation side of IT as the next...

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Categories: Communities

Visual Report Improvements

TargetProcess - Edge of Chaos Blog - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 09:33
Period scale for date axis

Dates are scaled as continuous axes by default. Sometimes there is a need to use periodic scales for dates. You can now switch scale type from field popup.

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Legend

Legend filtering has been improved. Now, several categories in the legend can be selected and changes will be reflected on the chart.

2017-04-13-15-24-42

 

Tooltip

The mechanics of tooltip have been improved. Projection to axis was added for stacked bars and areas to see the total value of the stacked items.

2017-04-13-15-33-27

We will really appreciate your feedback on our reports editor. What do you like about it? What could be improved? Let us know what you think at ux@targetprocess.com

Categories: Companies

Learning Git with GitKraken: Rebasing in GitKraken vs CLI

About SCRUM - Hamid Shojaee Axosoft - Tue, 04/18/2017 - 01:00

In these videos, Brett Goldman compares the experience of performing a very basic rebase in the CLI vs GitKraken, followed by a demonstration of what happens, and what to do, when conflicts occur. Take a look and subscribe to our YouTube channel for more videos about learning Git with GitKraken.

Categories: Companies

Leadership re-envisioned in the 21st Century

Is there a new form of leadership being envisioned in the 21st Century?  Is there someone challenging the traditional form of organizational structure?

Leading Wisely - a pod cast with Ricardo Semler.
Leading Wisely
"Join organizational changemaker Ricardo Semler in conversation with leaders challenging assumptions and changing how we live and work."
S1E01: Killing the Dinosaur Business Model (Part 1) with Basecamp’s Jason Fried & DHH

S1E02: Killing the Dinosaur Business Model (Part 2) with Basecamp’s Jason Fried & DHH
S1E03: Reinventing Organizations with Frederic Laloux

S1E04: Self-organization with Zappos' Tony Hsieh
S1E05: Busting Innovation Myths with David Burkus

S1E06: Merit and Self-Management with Jurgen Appelo

S1E07: Letting Values Inform Organizational Structure with Jos de Blok

S1E08: Corporate Liberation with Isaac Getz

S1E09: The Police & Self-Management with Erwin van Waeleghem

S1E10: Season Finale: The Common Denominator with Rich Sheridan of Joy Inc.


A ran across this series of 10 talks because I'm a fan of Joy, Inc. author and leader of Menlo innovations, Richard Sheridan.  I saw a tweet about his talk and found a bucket of goodness.
The Common Denominator with Rich Sheridan of Joy Inc.

Richard Sheridan on podcast Leading WiselySee Also:A Review of Leadership ModelsExamples of 21st C. CompaniesSafety - the perquisite for Leadership
A Leadership Paradox

Book List:
Maverick!: The Success Story Behind the World's Most Unusual Workplace by Ricardo SemlerJoy, Inc : How We Built a Workplace People Love by Richard SheridanReWork: Change the Way You Work Forever by David Heinemeier Hansson and Jason Fried
Reinventing Organizations: A Guide to Creating Organizations Inspired by the Next Stage in Human Consciousness by Frederic Laloux
Categories: Blogs

Certified Agile Leadership course in San Diego April 25-27

Agile Game Development - Mon, 04/17/2017 - 15:01
The key to successful agile adoption and growth lies not only with developers, but studio leadership as well. We all know that cross-discipline teams iterating on features creates a benefit, but to achieve the far greater (and rarer) reward of developer engagement and motivated productivity, you need deeper cultural change.  This requires a shift in the mindset of leadership.
The Certified Agile Leadership (CAL) course provides this shift.  It distills the experience and wisdom of decades of experience applying agile successfully and leads to true leadership transformation.  In taking the course, I personally found that not only were my leadership approaches transformed, but it altered how I engaged with family, friends and my own life.
I will be joining the CAL course being taught by my friend and occasional co-trainer Peter Green In San Diego on April 25th through the 27th.  Please join us!
http://agileforall.com/course/cal1/
Categories: Blogs

Scrum Knowledge Sharing

SpiraPlan is a agile project management system designed specifically for methodologies such as scrum, XP and Kanban.